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April 2017

Intro to Rust Lightning Talk

Efe Alatan, a senior at NYU Tandon, gave a brief overview Rust.

Dissecting a Fingerprint Sensor

Daniel Lawson hacked a fingerprint sensor 10 ways from Sunday and shared his findings with us. All bugs identified were reported the vendor and are in the process of being fixed. Dan is a security consultant at MWR.

Transport Layer Security 1.3

The protocol that protects most of the Internet secure connections is getting the biggest ever revamp, and is losing a round-trip. We will explore differences between TLS 1.3 and previous versions in detail, focusing on the security improvements of the new protocol as well as some of the challenges we face around securely implementing new features such as 0-RTT resumption. At Cloudflare we will be the first to deploy TLS 1.3 on a wide scale, and we’ll be able to discuss the insights we gained while implementing and deploying this protocol. Nick Sullivan is the head of cryptography at Cloudflare.

February 2017

Manticore Demo

Mark Mossberg of Trail of Bits gave a short demo of Manticore, a ruthlessly effective hybrid symbolic-concrete (“concolic”) execution system that scales to large programs with numerous dependencies, complex interaction, and manual setup. Manticore is being prepared for a public release in March.

Bootstrapping a slightly more secure laptop

Heads is an open source custom firmware and OS configuration for laptops and servers that aims to provide slightly better physical security and protection for data on the system. Unlike Tails, which aims to be a stateless OS that leaves no trace on the computer of its presence, Heads is intended to store data and state. It targets specific models of commodity hardware and takes advantage of lessons learned from vulnerability research. This talk provides an overview of Heads, a demo of installing it on a Thinkpad, and a tour of the attacks that it protects against. Presented by Trammell Hudson.

When Bad Things Happen to Good Computers

We discuss the current state-of-the-art in the field of electromagnetic fault injection (EMFI) and our on-going research into the matter. We present motivational examples show-casing the potential capabilities of EMFI techniques against secure embedded hardware. We also discuss the draw-backs of traditional EMFI techniques and hard physical limitations of such techniques in its current incarnation. Lastly, we informally unveil our soon-to-be-open-sourced BadFET, a high-powered nano-second zero-recovery time multiple firing EMP system, and yes, it will probably kill you if you touched it. Presented by Ang Cui and Rick Housley of Red Balloon Security.

December 2016

Be a Binary Rockstar: An Intro to Program Analysis with Binary Ninja

Many static analyses, such as LLVM passes, depend on the ability to compile source code and cannot operate on binaries. Binary Ninja offers a new Intermediate Language (IL) that makes running such analyses on binaries much easier. I will describe how to use the Binary Ninja IL to automatically discover memory corruption vulnerabilities in binary code, and introduce the concepts of variable analysis, abstract interpretation, and integer range analysis in the process. Presented by Sophia D’Antoine of Trail of Bits.

Shuffler: Fast and Deployable Continuous Code Re-Randomization

Just-In-Time ROP (JIT-ROP) techniques, where an attacker uses a memory disclosure vulnerability to discover code gadgets at runtime are particularly pernicious. We designed a code-reuse defense, called Shuffler, which continuously re-randomizes code locations on the order of milliseconds, introducing a real-time deadline on the attacker. Shuffler focuses on being fast, self-hosting, and nonintrusive to the end user. Evaluation shows that Shuffler defends against all known forms of code reuse, including ROP, direct JIT-ROP, indirect JIT-ROP, and Blind ROP. Presented by David Williams-King, a PhD student at Columbia University.

October 2016

Differential Fuzzing with LLVM’s LibFuzzer

We extended libFuzzer to support differential fuzzing of applications of similar functionality (e.g., SSL libraries) and developed a set of new metrics to guide input generation, particularly retrofitted towards differential testing. We’ll be doing a demo of the engine and present some of the bugs we found. Presented by Theofilos Petsios and Adrian Tang, PhD candidates at Columbia University.

DARPA spent hundreds of thousands of my tax dollars creating small C and C++ programs that include exploitable software flaws. We took those programs, ported them to Linux and OS X, and used them as a shooting gallery for static and dynamic analysis tools. Let’s see where each tool excels and where each tool fails. Presented by Ryan Stortz, a principal security researcher at Trail of Bits.

August 2016

ProtoFuzz: A Google Protocol Buffers Message Generator

Yan Ivnitskiy, a Principal Security Engineer at Trail of Bits, presented ProtoFuzz, a generic fuzzer for Google’s Protocol Buffers format. Instead of defining a new fuzzer generator for custom binary formats, protofuzz automatically creates a fuzzer based on the same format definition that programs use. ProtoFuzz is implemented as a stand-alone Python3 program.

Dash: A Web-based tool for Writing Shellcode

Pete Markowsky, a security researcher from NYC, presented Dash, a simple Python Flask-based web application for reading and writing assembly. Think of it as a REPL for various assembly languages. Dash explores how one might design an IDE for writing shellcode.

Algo: A 1-click IPSEC VPN in the Cloud

Dan Guido, CEO of Trail of Bits, presented Algo VPN, a set of Ansible scripts that simplifies the setup of an IPSEC VPN. It contains the most secure defaults available, works with common cloud providers, and does not require client software on most devices.

cool hacking meetup in NYC https://t.co/cpRKELA9p3 @dguido https://t.co/gUMFoyrEp7

— Elissa Shevinsky (@ElissaBeth) August 13, 2016

June 2016

Doorman: An OSQuery Fleet Manager

OSQuery turns operating system information into a format that can be queried using standard SQL-based statements. But once you’ve got that data, how do you search it? Until now, you’d have to engineer your own front-end management console. Enter Doorman. This simple web interface allows you to manage your entire fleet of OSQuery machines. In this Empire Hacking talk, Marcin Wielgoszewski, a security engineer, demonstrated how Doorman works, and answered questions about its deployment and use.

Tidas: Passwordless Auth with the Secure Enclave

Nick Esposito, a Senior Software Engineer at Trail of Bits, discussed the design of Tidas, a solution for password-free authentication for iOS software developers. Tidas takes advantage of our unique capability to generate and store ECC keys inside the Secure Enclave.

Beyond Corp: Lessons learned from 5 years of endpoint attestation

An increasingly mobile workforce and the ubiquity of attacks on client platforms limit the effectiveness of the traditional corporate network perimeter-security model. Beyond Corp is a broad effort to re-architect the delivery of Google corporate computing services, removing privileges granted solely on the basis of network address. The underlying architecture relies on a model of machine identity, authentication, and state-aware authorization to provide differential to services. August Huber, a data defender at Google, discussed the background of the work, general approach, challenges encountered, and future directions.

We just broke our pre-registration record (75 hackers)! Come see BeyondCorp, Tidas, and Doorman tomorrow @Spotify https://t.co/tlBDTOu5md

— Empire Hacking (@EmpireHacking) June 6, 2016

April 2016

Putting the Hype in Hypervisor

Brandon Falk, a software security researcher, operating system developer and fuzzing enthusiast, presented various ways of gathering code coverage information without binary modification and how to use code coverage to direct fuzzing.

Crypto Challenges and Fails

Ben Agre, a computer security consultant, distinguished successful crypto challenges from failures through the lens of challenges offered by RSA, Telegram, and several smaller examples.

Great week: Hanging out at the NCC NYC office, going to @EmpireHacking, and seeing David Gilmour at MSG tonight!

— David Schuetz (@DarthNull) April 11, 2016

February 2016

Reversing Engineering the Tytera MD380 2-way Radio

Travis Goodspeed, a neighbor, explained how the handheld digital radio used for the Digital Mobile Radio (DMR) protocol was jailbroken to allow for patching and firmware extraction, as well as the tricks used to patch the firmware for new features, such as promiscuous mode and a secondary application.

The Mobile Application Security Toolkit (MAST)

Sophia D’Antoine addressed the design of the Mobile Application Security Toolkit (MAST) which ties together jailbreak detection, anti-debugging, and anti-reversing in LLVM for protection of iOS applications.

not much worst than being in new york but not being able to attend @EmpireHacking . will have to catch the next one! #infosec @nysecsec

— geminiimatt/'mateo' (@geminiimatt) February 10, 2016

December 2015

Exploiting Out-of-Order Execution for Covert Cross-VM Communication

Sophia D’Antoine, one of our security engineers, demonstrated a novel side channel that exploits out-of-order execution to enable cross-VM communication.

Experiments building and visualizing hypergraphs of security data

Richard Lethin, President of Reservoir Labs, discussed data structures and algorithms that enable the representation and analysis of big data (such as security logs) as hypergraphs.

Packed house tonight! pic.twitter.com/wCDxoyW2zQ

— Empire Hacking (@EmpireHacking) December 8, 2015

October 2015

The PointsTo Use-After-Free Detector

Peter Goodman, our very own dynamic binary translator, presented the design of PointsTo, an LLVM-based static analysis system that automatically finds use-after-free vulnerabilities in large codebases.

Protecting Virtual Function Calls in COTS C++ Binaries

Aravind Prakash, an assistant professor in the Dept. of Computer Science at Binghamton University, showed how vfGuard protects virtual function calls in C++ from control subversion attacks.

Definitely enjoyed @EmpireHacking prog analysis talks tonight, thanks @dguido for making this happen! I'll be there next time with more Q's!

— Julien Vanegue (@jvanegue) October 14, 2015

August 2015

Exploiting the Nintendo 3DS

Luke Arntson, a hobbyist security researcher, reverse engineer, and hardware hacker, highlighted the origins of the Nintendo DS Profile exploit, the obfuscated Gateway browser exploit, and the payloads used by both.

Trail of Bits Cyber Grand Challenge (CGC) Demo

Ryan Stortz, one of our security engineers, described the high-level architecture of the system we built to fight and destroy insecure software as part of a DARPA competition, how well it worked, and difficulties we overcame during the development process.

OS X Malware

Jay Little, another of our security engineers, gave a code review of Hacking Team’s OS X kernel rootkit in just 10 minutes.

Loving this turbo talk on OS X Malware! Helpful & Jay Little = hilarious! launchd my new friend. @empirehacking pic.twitter.com/hpKsDtSmRf

— geminiimatt/'mateo' (@geminiimatt) August 12, 2015

June 2015

Offense at Scale

Chris Rohlf from Yahoo discussed the effects of scale on vulnerability research, fuzzing and real attack campaigns.

Automatically proving program termination (and more!)

Dr. Byron Cook, Professor of Computer Science at University College London, shared research advances that have led to practical tools for automatically proving program termination and related properties.

Cellular Baseband Exploitation

Nick DePetrillo, one of our principal security engineers, explored the challenges of reliable, large-scale cellular baseband exploitation.

"Halting problem? What halting problem?" Byron Cook at @EmpireHacking, basically.

— Jan Schaumann (@jschauma) June 9, 2015